Kategorie: USA

1. American Life in Poetry: Column 497

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

I’d guess everybody reading this has felt the guilt of getting rid of belongings that meant more to somebody else than they did to you. Here’s a poem by Jennifer Maier, who lives in Seattle. Don’t call her up. All her stuff is gone.

Rummage Sale

Forgive me, Aunt Phyllis, for rejecting the cut
glass dishes—the odd set you gathered piece
by piece from thirteen boxes of Lux laundry soap.

Pardon me, eggbeater, for preferring the whisk;
and you, small ship in a bottle, for the diminutive
size of your ocean. Please don’t tell my mother,

hideous lamp, that the light you provided
was never enough. Domestic deities, do not be angry
that my counters are not white with flour;

no one is sorrier than I, iron skillet, for the heavy
longing for lightness directing my mortal hand.
And my apologies, to you, above all,

forsaken dresses, that sway from a rod between
ladders behind me, clicking your plastic tongues
at the girl you once made beautiful,

and the woman, with a hard heart and
softening body, who stands in the driveway
making change.

American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright ©2013 by Jennifer Maier from her most recent book of poems, Now, Now, University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013. Poem reprinted by permission of Jennifer Maier and the publisher. Introduction copyright © 2014 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction’s author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006. We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

101. Invented Languages

Bei Dazed Digital “Ten of the weirdest invented languages in literature”. Darunter A Book From the Sky des Künstlers Xu Bing (1988), das aussieht wie Chinesisch, aber jedes Zeichen erfunden:

 

Ferner Klingonisch, Þrjótrunn des Isländers Henrik Theiling (2007), Alex’ vom Russischen inspirierte Sprache in A Clockwork Orange, das mysteriöse Voynich-Manuskript und mehr. Lesens- und Ansehenswert.

100. American Life in Poetry: Column 496

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

One of Grant Wood’s earliest paintings is of a pair of old shoes, and it hangs in the art museum in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where Wood grew up. Here’s a different kind of still life, in words, from Jim Daniels, who lives in Pittsburgh. The shoes we put on our feet gradually become like the person wearing them.

Work Boots: Still Life

Next to the screen door
work boots dry in the sun.
Salt lines map the leather
and laces droop
like the arms of a new-hire
waiting to punch out.
The shoe hangs open like the sigh
of someone too tired to speak
a mouth that can almost breathe.
A tear in the leather reveals
a shiny steel toe
a glimpse of the promise of safety
the promise of steel and the years to come.

American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem reprinted from Show and Tell, Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 2003, courtesy of the University of Wisconsin Press. Copyright ©2003 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. Jim Daniels’ most recent book of poems is Birth Marks, BOA Editions, Ltd., 2013. Introduction copyright © 2014 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction’s author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006. We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

95. American Life in Poetry: Column 495

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

We’re at the end of the gardening season here on the Great Plains, and the garden described in this poem by Karina Borowicz, who lives in Massachusetts, is familiar to tomato fanciers all across the country.

September Tomatoes

The whiskey stink of rot has settled
in the garden, and a burst of fruit flies rises
when I touch the dying tomato plants.

Still, the claws of tiny yellow blossoms
flail in the air as I pull the vines up by the roots
and toss them in the compost.

It feels cruel. Something in me isn’t ready
to let go of summer so easily. To destroy
what I’ve carefully cultivated all these months.
Those pale flowers might still have time to fruit.

My great-grandmother sang with the girls of her village
as they pulled the flax. Songs so old
and so tied to the season that the very sound
seemed to turn the weather.

American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright © 2013 by Karina Borowicz, whose most recent book of poems isProof (Codhill Press, 2014). Poem first appeared in the journal ECOTONE and is reprinted by permission of Karina Borowicz and the publisher Introduction copyright © 2014 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction’s author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006. We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

73. Gestorben

Ein großer Dichter und Humanist ist gestorben – der Dichter, Schriftsteller, Essayist und Lehrer Gilbert Desmée. Er starb am vorigen Sonnabend in Ohio in den USA, wo er sich zusammen mit seiner Frau, der Bildhauerin Maria Desmée, aufhielt.

Gilbert Desmée wurde am 29.1. 1951 in Suresnes (Hauts-de-Seine) geboren. Er war Präsident des Schriftstellerverbands in der Picardie und der Kommission Literarisches Leben des Centre régional du Livre en Picardie (CR2L).

Er veröffentlichte ein Dutzend Gedichtbände u.a. bei L’Arbre à Parole, éditions Rencontres, Corps Puce sowie Essays. / Courrier Picard

Weitere Todesfälle der letzten Wochen:

 

71. Lyrik am Bildschirm?

Im Kampf der Titanen zwischen den gedruckten und den elektronischen Büchern um die Vorherrschaft in der Literatur gab es Nischen, welche ich uneinnehmbar für die Newcomer hielt. Man kann Börsenberichte auf dem Bildschirm lesen, Zeitungen und vor allem auch ganz dicke Romane, die empfindliche Sehnenscheiden entzünden. Aber Lyrik? Nein!

Dachten wir vom Klub der zarten Dichter im Salon des Gegengiftes. Jetzt aber hören wir (woher sonst als aus den USA?), dass Gedichtbände als E-Books unglaubliche Steigerungsraten erzielen. Noch vor sieben Jahren publizierten die Verlage dort nur 200elektronische Bände mit Poemen. 2013 waren es bereits zehnmal so viel. Bei insgesamt 10.000 Lyrik-Büchern ist das wirklich eine beachtliche Zahl. / Norbert Mayer, Die Presse

68. Charles Bernstein Papers

The Beinecke Library is delighted to announce the acquisition of the Charles Bernstein Papers; the collection will be available to researchers in 2015.
Poet and scholar Charles Bernstein has long been a force in American letters. The author of dozens of books, in the 1970s Bernstein co-founded the influential journal L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E. He is the co-founder and co-editor, with Al Filreis, of PennSound; with Loss Pequenño Glazier, he is founder of The Electronic Poetry Center.
Bernstein’s many books of poetry include Recalculating (2012), All the Whiskey in Heaven: Selected Poems (2010), Girly Man (2006), With Strings(2001), Republics of Reality: 1975-1995 (2000), Dark City (1994), Rough Trades (1991), The Nude Formalism (1989), Stigma (1981), Legend (with Bruce Andrews, Steve McCaffery, Ron Silliman, Ray DiPalma, 1980), andParsing (1976). He is also the author of books of essays, including: My Way: Speeches and Poems (1999), A Poetics (1992), and Content’s Dream: Essays 1975-1984 (1986). He has edited many anthologies of poetry and poetics including Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word (1998) and The L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E Book (1984, with Bruce Andrews). Bernstein has made many works in collaboration with artists and musicians, including several operas. His collaborations with composer Ben Yarmolinsky, have been collected in Blind Witness: Three American Operas (2008). Bernstein also collaborated with composer Brian Ferneyhough on Shadowtime, an opera about the life and work of Walter Benjamin.
Elected to the fellowship of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2006, Bernstein has received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. He is presently Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.
The Charles Bernstein Papers includes manuscripts and typescripts of poems, essays, and other writings; notebooks; correspondence; materials related to the Poetics Program at SUNY Buffalo; and manuscripts by fellow poets and writers. The collection includes Bernstein’s voluminous email correspondence with hundreds of poets, writers, critics, artists, and scholars, as well as the poet’s library of approximately 1,000 contributor’s copies of magazines and anthologies, including those in translation and other rarities. Poets and writers represented by manuscripts and / or correspondence include: Robert Creeley, Susan Howe, Rae Armantrout, Charles Alteri, Rachel Blau DuPlessi, Johanna Drucker, Annie Finch, Peter Gizzi, Barbara Guest, Nathaniel Mackey, Ann Lauterbach, Susan Stewart, Leslie Scalapino, Clayton Eschelman, Ulla Dydo, among many others. / More