56. Hu yu yux

Charles Bicalho has worked and translated songs from the Maxakali, such as the “Sacred Song of the Leaf”, composed with an extreme economy of means. The poem-song, which the Maxakali call yãmîy in their language, fuses its rhythms with the very movements of nature, in a cycle of constant renewal and repetition. The movements of the leaf and the poem as interconnected:

hu yu yux
hu yu yux

leaf comes
flying with
yãmîy comes
falling with

leaf comes
flying with
yãmîy comes
falling with

hu yu yux
hu yu yux

Other invaluable efforts include the work of Pedro Cesarino, who has recently published a translation of the “Yawa shõka”, or “Song to attract wild pigs” from the Marubo people.

Bruna Franchetto is currently working on the translation of female songs from the Kuikuru, and Douglas Diegues, an important Brazilian poet living close to the border of Brazil and Paraguay – where the Guarani language is still spoken by a significant part of the population, has recently published his translation of the “Ayvu Rapyta”, a long and powerful poem from the Mbya Guarani.

Brazilian poetry hasn´t been totally impervious to these traditions. The most important Brazilian poet in the XIX century, Joaquim de Sousândrade (1832 – 1902), delved into the Amerindian cosmogonies to write his epic “O Guesa” (1884), of which the most famous canto is the highly experimental “Wall Street Inferno”, with its babelic poliphony of languages. / Ricardo Domeneck, Babelsprech

Kommentar verfassen

Bitte logge dich mit einer dieser Methoden ein, um deinen Kommentar zu veröffentlichen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Google Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d Bloggern gefällt das: